Great news for nature lovers in Boston! Mass Audubon has announced 3 new openings – New Pathways in Natick, Knoll Stroll Trail in the Oak Knoll Wildlife Sanctuary, and an accessible barn in Lenox. These are a result of Mass Audubon’s new five-year Action Agenda to create inclusive and equitable access to nature by opening trails over 50 miles.

Details About the New Opening at the Mass Audubon 

New Pathways in Natick

In May 2021, as a part of the first phase of the project, Mass Audubon opened a new trail and a scenic bridge overlooking the Little Farm Pond. It replaced an otherwise unsafe and often flooded plank walkway. These trails have been improved following a comprehensive study done by Peter Jensen, a nationally recognized trail development expert. The plan involves creating reroutes, adding puncheon, creating scenic viewpoints on all nine miles of trail.

Knoll Stroll Trail

Attleboro’s Oak Knoll Wildlife Sanctuary, located right on Park Street, has been a community center for a long time. However, the opening of the new Knoll Stroll Trail simplifies access to the sanctuary via public transportation, thus clearing a barrier to enjoy the natural oasis within the city. The sanctuary has been trying to connect to the GATRA bus for quite a long. Accordingly, it acquired the 26-acred Dorrance Property in 2019 and translated its efforts into reality.

Barn in Lenox

The Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary has been a vibrant conservation hub, environmental awareness, and outdoor recreation in the Berkshires. Mass Audubon’s creative nature-based programming is considered to be a vital community resource that encourages self-discovery and exploration.

However, the sanctuary’s age-old facilities rendered creativity, expansion, and supportive collaboration impossible. So, to support diverse modern-day needs, the sanctuary launched its Opening Doors to Nature  Campaign. One of its results is the opening of an energy-efficient and accessible addition to its 18th-century barn.

About Mass Audubon

Mass Audubon is a statewide initiative that protects over 38,000 acres of land across Massachusetts to save birds, wildlife and make nature accessible to everyone. It receives over half a million visitors every year to its wildlife sanctuaries and 20 nature centers. Over the years, it has evolved into a nationally recognized environmental education leader that conducts several camps, schools, and adult programs.

 

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